Christina Agapakis

Christina Agapakis is a synthetic biologist whose research explores the role of design, ecology, and evolution in biological engineering. Her scientific work spans many scales, from proteins to plants to microbial communities. Through collaboration with biologists, engineers, artists, and designers, she pushes the boundaries of synthetic biology from the strict view of cells as computational devices to a more fluid understanding of the function and evolution of living things. In addition to her research and teaching in biological engineering and design, she explores the social and ethical dimensions of biological engineering through writing and film. Having recently completed her Ph.D. at Harvard University, she is cur- rently a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a 2012 L'Oreal USA For Women in Science fellow.

Sissel Tolaas

With a background in mathematics, chemical science, linguistics and languages, and visual art, Sissel Tolaas has dedicated herself to Nose /Smell in all levels of life for more than twenty years. She has an archive of 6730 smells from reality, plus a lab archive of 2500 molecules. Sissel's knowledge and expertise is in simulation – simulation through synthetic molecules – the air and smells that surround us all the time, from body sweat or smells from hardcore neighbourhoods. Her aim is and ask questions, train tolerance and train awareness. To do this Sissel works internationally, interdisciplinarily and collaboratively. Her work is about making systems of smells as a basis for communication, used for the purposes of navigation, education, design, architecture, health care, and environment. Sissel has exhibited at SFMOMA, San Francisco; MOMA, New York; the Guggenheim, Venice and Berlin; Museum of Modern Art, Berlin; National Art Museum of China, Beijing; biennales in Berlin, Venice, Tirana, Gwangju, Liverpool. Recent awards include the Rouse Foundation Award 2009, Harvard Graduate School of Design and an ArsElectronica Award 2010.
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Women In Science

Christina Agapakis has won a prestigious 2012 L’Oréal USA Fellowship for Women in Science. Christina plans to continue her work investigating symbioisis in synthetic lifeforms with this post-doctoral award. 

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Christina Agapakis and BoingBoing's Maggie Koerth-Baker

Synthetic Aesthetics' resident and Harvard synthetic biologist Christina Agapakis in conversation with Maggie Koerth-Baker, discussing synthetic biology, design, cheese and women in science and blogging. Watch the discussion here!

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Cheese Smell Adventure

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"This is basic science that's really, really interesting because if bacteria can really smell, that's something unexpected."
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23/03/2012 – 20:37 – Lestheprof said:
Is it? Bacteria need to be able to move towards nutrients, etc, to swim in the direction of increasing concentrations of chemicals. Consider surface molecules over the extent of the bacterium, responding differentially to varying concentrations...mind you, considering the size of bacteria, the delta but be *really* small ...
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